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twin peaks

Part 7
Written by Mark Frost & David Lynch
Directed by David Lynch

David Patrick Kelly in a still from Twin Peaks. Photo: Suzanne Tenner/SHOWTIME

We begin with Jerry Horne standing in the middle of the woods distraught and confused. He calls his brother Ben who picks up and Jerry slowly, but panicked explains his car has been stolen. Throughout the conversation, Jerry doesn’t seem to know exactly when and where he is, finally shouting “I think I’m high!”. The incident is never resolved later, but I assume Ben sent someone to look for Jerry or Jerry came to his senses. While positively dripping with that dry humor of Lynch, I was reminded of the Secret History book and how it cataloged many incidents of Twin Peaks residents wandering into the woods only to encounter entities from the Lodge. I wonder if Jerry met something while he was out there.

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Part 6
Written by David Lynch & Mark Frost
Directed by David Lynch

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We find Cooper in the same spot from the last episode, spending the night standing next to the statue of the lawman. A security guard approaches him and seems to sense something is off. Cooper is trying to get the green blazer off during this conversation and eventually divulges enough info to be taken back to Dougie’s house. Janey meets them at the door and brings Cooper inside. One of the guards points out a larger envelope on the floor. Janey decides to take Coop to the doctor the next day because of his behavior.

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Part 5
Written by Mark Frost and David Lynch
Directed by David Lynch

twin peaks part 5

Part 5 kicks off with the two men hired to take out Dougie Jones. They make a fall call to their employer, a very harried and anxious woman on the verge of tears. They explain they’ve been staking out Dougie’s car with no luck. She hangs up and sends a message via a pager/burner phone. The recipient is marked “Argent” on her phone, and the message is just a series of numbers. We cut to a dingy basement and a small black box electronic device, the implication being that this is where her message went. It just happens to be the same type of device Bob was using to get in contact with Phillip Jeffries back in Part 2.

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David Lynch: The Art Life (2017)
Directed by Jon Nguyen, Olivia Neergaard-Holm, Rick Barnes

lynch art life

For some strange reason, David Lynch is not the household name it once was in the early 1990s. And those who do know the name think of him primarily as a filmmaker. He has some pretty major works of cinema attached to his name: Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Mulholland Drive. Twin Peaks is likely the most major work he’s ever released. But Lynch views himself as a visual artist and painter who also makes films. The images he has imported from his paintings into his film work are some of the most stunning, surreal things put on the screen. He’s also an incredibly cryptic director when it comes to talking about his work, preferring not to publicly analyze and dissect it, going to far as to give simple yes or no answers when asked about details in discussion with film critic Mark Kermode.

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Episode 4
Written by Mark Frost & David Lynch
Directed by David Lynch

dale cooper coffee

The fourth episode, which ends up being one of the most comedic things I’ve seen Lynch direct (yet still terrifying in its final moments), begins at the Silver Mustang Casino where Cooper is racking up the winnings. A slot junkie who has befriended Cooper, so he’ll he point out the machines about to pay out nicknames our hero “Mr. Jackpots”. The management of the casino is less than pleased about Cooper’s streak, but there is no evidence he is cheating or rigging the machines. In between playing the slots, Cooper runs into Bill and Candy Shaker (Ethan Suplee and Sara Paxton), friends of Dougie Jones. Bill remarks that “Dougie” is “taking a walk on the wild side” while Candy seems to pick up on the fact that something is very wrong with Cooper. In passing they mention that “Dougie” lives on Lancelot Avenue at the house with the red door, just around the corner from Merlin’s Market. These Arthurian name drops to go along with the location of the gate to the Black Lodge in Twin Peaks, Glastonbury Grove. As Cooper stumbles out to the bay of cabs, he’s stopped by a casino employee who takes him to the manager so that he can collect his winnings. The manager gives an air of annoyance about the winning streak and grudgingly asks Cooper to come back and visit soon

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Episode 3
Written by Mark Frost & David Lynch
Directed by David Lynch

twin peaks cooper casino

It’s becoming increasingly apparent that this isn’t just a new iteration of Twin Peaks, but a revisiting and refining of all David Lynch’s themes and motifs. I also believe he and Frost are using this platform to revisit their unproduced scripts One Saliva Bubble and Ronnie Rocket. Both are very surrealistic films and Albert Rosenfeld quotes the subtitle to Ronnie Rocket at the end of this episode: “The Absurd Mystery of the Strange Forces of Existence”. Ronnie Rocket features the lead character traveling through surreal landscapes and electricity as a powerful representation of life and the energy of otherworldly beings. The more I reflect on these first four episodes the more it solidifies that this is Lynch’s magnum opus.

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Episode 2
Written by Mark Frost and David Lynch
Directed by David Lynch

twin peaks cooper

Part Two of the premiere takes us back to Buckhorn, South Dakota. High school principal Bill Hastings is stewing away in a jail cell when his wife Phyllis comes to visit. Bill insists he was never at the deceased librarian Ruth Davenport’s home, but that he dreamed about being in her apartment the night forensics say she was killed. Phyllis spits back that she knew Bill was having an affair with Ruth to which he replies that he has been aware of Phyllis ongoing relationship with their lawyer, George. Bill also mentions that he is aware of “someone else.” The marriage gets a very definite period on its sentence when Phyllis lets him know he’s going to rot in jail and leaves.

Then events take a very strange turn: Bill sits in his cell coming to terms with the fact that his life, as he knows it is over and the camera moves down the row of cells. We find a man, clothes and skin pitch black, with a black beard sitting silently in a cell, mouth agape. After a few seconds, he fades away, except for his head which floats out of the top frame. Phyllis, meanwhile, returns to her home only to find Bob (as Cooper) waiting for her. She recognizes and smiles, explains that Bill is finished and Bob remarks that she followed human nature just as he expected. He draws a gun, which belongs to George, the lawyer. She attempts to run and blows her brains out from behind and leaves the gun, presumably to implicate George.

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