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Episode 4
Written by Mark Frost & David Lynch
Directed by David Lynch

dale cooper coffee

The fourth episode, which ends up being one of the most comedic things I’ve seen Lynch direct (yet still terrifying in its final moments), begins at the Silver Mustang Casino where Cooper is racking up the winnings. A slot junkie who has befriended Cooper, so he’ll he point out the machines about to pay out nicknames our hero “Mr. Jackpots”. The management of the casino is less than pleased about Cooper’s streak, but there is no evidence he is cheating or rigging the machines. In between playing the slots, Cooper runs into Bill and Candy Shaker (Ethan Suplee and Sara Paxton), friends of Dougie Jones. Bill remarks that “Dougie” is “taking a walk on the wild side” while Candy seems to pick up on the fact that something is very wrong with Cooper. In passing they mention that “Dougie” lives on Lancelot Avenue at the house with the red door, just around the corner from Merlin’s Market. These Arthurian name drops to go along with the location of the gate to the Black Lodge in Twin Peaks, Glastonbury Grove. As Cooper stumbles out to the bay of cabs, he’s stopped by a casino employee who takes him to the manager so that he can collect his winnings. The manager gives an air of annoyance about the winning streak and grudgingly asks Cooper to come back and visit soon

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Episode 3
Written by Mark Frost & David Lynch
Directed by David Lynch

twin peaks cooper casino

It’s becoming increasingly apparent that this isn’t just a new iteration of Twin Peaks, but a revisiting and refining of all David Lynch’s themes and motifs. I also believe he and Frost are using this platform to revisit their unproduced scripts One Saliva Bubble and Ronnie Rocket. Both are very surrealistic films and Albert Rosenfeld quotes the subtitle to Ronnie Rocket at the end of this episode: “The Absurd Mystery of the Strange Forces of Existence”. Ronnie Rocket features the lead character traveling through surreal landscapes and electricity as a powerful representation of life and the energy of otherworldly beings. The more I reflect on these first four episodes the more it solidifies that this is Lynch’s magnum opus.

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Episode 2
Written by Mark Frost and David Lynch
Directed by David Lynch

twin peaks cooper

Part Two of the premiere takes us back to Buckhorn, South Dakota. High school principal Bill Hastings is stewing away in a jail cell when his wife Phyllis comes to visit. Bill insists he was never at the deceased librarian Ruth Davenport’s home, but that he dreamed about being in her apartment the night forensics say she was killed. Phyllis spits back that she knew Bill was having an affair with Ruth to which he replies that he has been aware of Phyllis ongoing relationship with their lawyer, George. Bill also mentions that he is aware of “someone else.” The marriage gets a very definite period on its sentence when Phyllis lets him know he’s going to rot in jail and leaves.

Then events take a very strange turn: Bill sits in his cell coming to terms with the fact that his life, as he knows it is over and the camera moves down the row of cells. We find a man, clothes and skin pitch black, with a black beard sitting silently in a cell, mouth agape. After a few seconds, he fades away, except for his head which floats out of the top frame. Phyllis, meanwhile, returns to her home only to find Bob (as Cooper) waiting for her. She recognizes and smiles, explains that Bill is finished and Bob remarks that she followed human nature just as he expected. He draws a gun, which belongs to George, the lawyer. She attempts to run and blows her brains out from behind and leaves the gun, presumably to implicate George.

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Note: Due to the density of the material in the two-hour premiere, I’ll be reviewing each part separately. Look for Episode 2 tomorrow, Episode 3 on Wednesday, and Episode 4 on Thursday.

Episode 1

Written by Mark Frost and David Lynch
Directed by David Lynch

twin peaks hawk

First, let’s just think about the fact that we have new episodes of Twin Peaks on the air. I never imagined this would ever actually happen, so just that alone is worth celebrating. I will admit I wept three times during the premiere. As the Season 2 finale wrapped up on Showtime, I began to realize that I was about to see new Twin Peaks. I started to think about being nine years old and watching what was, up until last night, the last episode of the series. The next time the show got to me was Catherine Coulson’s appearance as The Log Lady and the return of Sheryl Lee as Laura Palmer.

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Twin Peaks wasn’t the first. I had seen Dune, broadcast on a local channel, the extended television cut. That is where I first remember Kyle MacLachlan from. The blue-eyed Paul Atreides, savior of the desert planet Arrakis. What I remember most though is the nightmarish Duke Vladimir Harkonnen brilliantly played by Kenneth MacMillan. These would come to be the two sides of David Lynch I would get to know: the staid hero and the dark evil beneath everything.

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The Revisit is a place for me to rewatch films I love but haven’t seen in years or films that didn’t click with me the first time. Through The Revisit, I reevaluate these movies and compare my original thoughts on them to how they feel in this more recent viewing.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992, dir. David Lynch)

fire walk with me

1992. It was a year since the television series Twin Peaks had ended and fans were clamoring to see director David Lynch’s feature film follow-up. The reaction had the Cannes Film Festival months earlier had been remarkably negative though. When the picture finally opened in theaters, the fan reaction was overwhelming negative as well. Fire Walk With Me didn’t feature the cast of citizens they’d come to love from the show. Also, it didn’t follow up on the shocking series finale that left the show’s protagonist in peril. Fire Walk With Me was seen as a critical and box office failure, a somber final note for a show that helped redefine the cultural landscape of television. Twin Peaks’ small life continued as the topic of niche internet discussion boards, and that seemed to be that.

Fire Walk With Me is a pretty confounding film, especially if you come in with lots of preconceived expectations of what you want it to be. Lynch essentially telegraphs his feelings about working the series in the opening shot: a sledgehammer smashing down on a static-filled television set. There is a very clear-cut narrative division in the film: The first thirty minutes and the remaining two hours.

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cooper

The show will look different

Once upon a time, David Lynch was a director hesitant and questioning of digital filmmaking. Throughout the early 2000s though he changed his tune experimenting with short pieces on his website and making music videos. With Inland Empire in 2006, he produced his first completely digital feature and hasn’t looked back since. Thus, Twin Peaks is going to look strange at first. I have no doubt it will be beautiful, in both traditional and grotesque ways, but it isn’t going to have the look of original series which was shot on video like most shows of its day. Characters are older, and the high definition images aren’t going to hide that either. From the bits and pieces, we have seen I am personally excited to explore the new aesthetics but know that it will take a little mental adjustment.

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